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Natural Meals in Minutes - Rita Bingham

Natural Meals in Minutes - Rita Bingham
Publisher ‏ :
‎ Natural Health Solutions; 4th edition (September 5, 2008)
Language ‏ :
‎ English
Paperback ‏ :
‎ 232 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ :
‎ 1882314093
ISBN-13 ‏ :
‎ 978-1882314096
Item Weight ‏ :
‎ 12.8 ounces
Dimensions ‏ :
‎ 6 x 0.75 x 8.5 inches
Availability:
In Stock

High Fiber, Low Fat Meatless Meals - in 30 Minutes or Less!

Learn how to make delicious meals using your food storage items.

Revolutionary new ideas for fast, nutritious meals. Guaranteed to change the way you use high-fiber, cholesterol-free grains, legumes, and vegetables.

If you are looking for ways to make healthy, delicious meals that are not packed with preservatives then this is the book for you. This book shows ways to make well balanced meals and snacks that are good for you and that don't take a lot of time to prepare. A section on how to sprout seeds and make homemade yogurt and cheeses is also included. Information on how to use grains and legumes are a great resource for those who have these items in their pantry or food storage.

An excellent cookbook of over 300 fast, simple, food storage recipes using grains, legumes, and sprouting seeds, in addition to fresh fruits and vegetables. Whether you're preparing for natural or man-made disasters, this book will show you how to make great basic meals from healthful, wholesome ingredients. Learn how to cook whole grains in only 3 minutes, cheeses and puddings in only 3 minutes, and complete meatless meals in 30 minutes or less!
 
This book contains delicious, low-fat, "heart-healthy" meals in these three easy-to-follow sections:
 
Introduction to Natural Foods - using whole grains and dried legumes (beans, peas and lentils).
 
Sprouting - techniques and tasty recipes for every meal of the day.
 
Powdered Milk - 3-Minute Powdered Milk Cheeses, Yogurt, and other milk favorites.
 
Breakfasts, Lunches, Dinners, Snacks and Desserts the whole family will love!
 
Since 1966, Rita Bingham has taught classes on cooking with basic foods. Her mother, Esther Dickey, wrote Passport To Survival more than 30 years ago, and spent many years crisscrossing the country, teaching seminars on cooking and survival techniques. Rita follows in her footsteps as she shares her knowledge of how to turn whole foods into quick, easy meals with thousands of people interested in taking responsibility for their health and well-being. Her recipes have received rave reviews by satisfied customers around the world. Rita has written a series of books on healthful eating; produced a training video to demonstrate some of the many ways nutritious foods can be prepared with a minimum amount of time; written articles for newspapers and magazines; co-hosted radio shows providing information and recipes for healthy eating. She has consulted for companies to help create marketable food products. She has also provided training on how to include nutritious foods in weight loss programs.
 
Rita is the creator of 3-minute soups, sauces and gravies made from bean, pea and lentil flours. These flours can also be used in all types of breads, as well as in any other recipe calling for wheat flour.
 
BASIC FOODS with basic flavorings produce amazingly good basic meals! In the interest of good health, my goal has always been to make fast, interesting meals with as many nutritious, low-fat, wholesome ingredients as possible (and still have teenagers enjoy eating at home). Like a basic sewing pattern where you add trimmings to suit your taste, this book is meant to help you get acquainted with basic foods so you can prepare them quickly and enjoy serving them at every meal. Then you can easily adjust the recipes to include the ingredients (trimmings) you have on hand. A well-stocked healthy pantry should include at least a four-week supply of the ingredients used in this book. In addition, include lots of fresh fruits and crunchy veggies (at least 5 servings per day).
 
WHEAT, the staff of life, is indeed a versatile grain. Used in appetizers, main dishes, salads, snacks and desserts, wheat adds flavor, texture, and protein as well as many important vitamins and minerals. Fiber in the American diet is a popular subject these days, and whole wheat is one of the best tasting and easiest to use sources of fiber available. Cracked wheat cooks in only 15 minutes and can be added to almost any recipe.
 
If you are just beginning to use high-fiber whole grains, start by including small quantities of cracked wheat or whole wheat flour each day in your diet, as large quantities of fiber foods can cause diarrhea.
 
Many people are becoming allergic to wheat. Whether this is because of the frequency of use, the many chemicals used in crop production, or because of some other undiscovered cause is not clear. Many people who have experienced strong reactions to wheat have found that they can tolerate sprouted wheat. Sprouting increases the enzymes necessary for digestion, so it is a possibility that some food allergies are related to an insufficient quantity of digestive enzymes.
 
Food Allergies: The best way to avoid food allergies of all types is to practice a 4-day rotation plan, using the foods most likely to cause an allergic reaction only every 4th day and only in small quantities. (These foods are: milk, eggs, wheat, soy and corn.) It also makes good sense to use sprouts, unprocessed whole grains, and organically grown foods whenever possible. Most people, after following this type of diet for a few weeks, find they can better tolerate the offending foods when eating out or with friends or when they just can't stand being so regimented for even one more MINUTE!
 
Many who are allergic to wheat can easily tolerate rice. While it is always best to use whole grains (as in brown rice), those unused to whole grain fiber may need to start by using white rice, then mixing in quantities of brown rice, gradually eliminating white rice. Brown Basmati rice is our family favorite-even for those who used to like only white rice. Like cracked wheat, cracked rice takes only 15 minutes to cook, even for long grain rice that traditionally takes 45 minutes to cook. Rice can be used in any recipe calling for whole or cracked wheat.
 
Triticale, spelt and kamut are all members of the wheat family, but are often tolerated by those allergic to wheat and can be used in place of wheat in any recipe. Barley, also an excellent source of nutrition and fiber, can be substituted in some recipes. It is a great addition to any soup.
 
When a recipe calls for wheat flour, a Gluten-Free (GF) flour mixture may be substituted. (Usually, extra leavening in the form of eggs or egg substitutes are added to replace the gluten found in wheat.) I find the commercial varieties very white, processed-tasting and pasty, so I have developed my own "healthy" mix using brown rice flour, whole bean flour and other ingredients. See index for Gluten Flour Mix recipe, or purchase GF Flour at your favorite health food store.
 
DRY BEANS (LEGUMES) are one of the best food bargains on the grocery shelves. Beans, peas and lentils are important staple foods for well over half the world's population. Many of us in the United States are just now learning to appreciate their hearty goodness. Most of us are familiar with pinto and kidney beans and homemade split pea soup, but there are many other, almost limitless ways to use legumes.
 
Legumes are born mixers as well as meat extenders. They can be mixed with other vegetables, used to "beef" up a salad, or served as dips and sandwich spreads. Legumes are a rich source of protein, iron, calcium, phosphorus, thiamine and potassium When combined with grains, they supply all the amino acids necessary to form a complete protein.
 
With advance preparation, beans can be added to many last-minute meals. Beans can be cooked, sprouted, cracked or even ground to a fine flour; then frozen until ready for use to preserve the nutrients.
 
See COUNTRY BEANS for nearly 400 great bean recipes, with nearly 120 fast, easy recipes using bean flour, the perfect way to cook beans in only 3 minutes for delicious, nutritious creamy soups, sauces and gravies (fat-free, of course!). You will also find nearly 300 fast recipes using whole or cracked beans for wholesome, filling, meatless meals in 30 minutes or less.
 
HONEY is the most natural sweetener, and is used in all recipes calling for a sweetener, although sugar may be substituted in many recipes using the following conversion: 1 c. honey = 1 1/4 c. sugar and 1/4 c. water. These recipes have been specially developed to use honey, and a number of changes would have to be made. Maple syrup can be used in place of honey using equal proportions. Note: Raw, unfiltered honey has been determined unsafe for babies less than 1 year old.
 
FLAVORINGS are an essential part of any natural food diet. I most often use vegetable or meat based bouillon or soup bases, and other ordinary cooking spices and seasonings. (For a more complete list of the ingredients used in this book, see p. 177) Liquid extracts or oils like coconut, cherry, mint, strawberry, etc., are compact and very helpful in making drinks, baked goods, etc., when fresh fruits are not available. Dry seasoning mixes such as Italian, taco, barbecue and enchilada are helpful, but not essential. All of these seasoning mixes can be made at home without preservatives and with little or no salt. As you find favorite recipes, buy and store quantities of your favorite herbs, spices, and flavorings to season them.
 
SKILLET COOKERY and "One Pot Meals" conserve time and energy. I've been accused of cooking as if I only own one pot, so I try to live up to my reputation! Many oven-baked recipes can be cooked in a skillet or dutch oven.
 
SAMPLE RECIPE:
 
SEAFOOD SALADFILLING
1/2 c. fat-free mayonnaise,
1/2 c. diced green onions,
1/4 c. catsup,
6 1/2 oz. can drained tuna in water (optional),
1 large diced tomato,
2 c. cooked rice or cracked wheat,
1/2 c. diced green pepper,
1/2 c. diced celery
 
Mix all ingredients well. Fill 6 pita pockets or use on toasted whole wheat bread.

 

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